Children and Abusive Marriages

Being in an abusive relationship is already hard enough, but when there are children involved the effects of such relationship can be complicated. Being a parent, you have the both the moral and legal responsibility of ensuring the safety and health of your child or children. Domestic violence does not only affect one parent, but also the child in the family, even if they are not experience any physical abuse. As a parent, it is your legal and moral obligation to ensure the long-term health of your child against the effect of domestic violence.

It may not be mainstream knowledge, but domestic violence and abuse are considered as a form of child maltreatment in certain areas. In an event of a divorce or child custody battle, claims of failing to protect the child from being exposed to domestic violence or abuse can put into consideration. The website of  Marshall & Taylor PLLC has information on the complications that domestic violence and abuse can cause in a divorce or child custody proceeding. A parent who fails to report child abuse (in any form) can be held liable in accordance to the Child Abuse Prevention and Treatment Act [pdf] or CAPTA. Being a victim of domestic violence or spousal abuse mean you are also in legal danger.

The legal argument in the parent’s responsibility for reporting domestic violence and abuse is various studies providing strong evidence of emotional and psychological damage in children who have grown up in an abusive or violent family. Children often feel emotionally deprived and could develop high risks of future physical abuse. Abusers often use intimidation and fear to control their partners and prevent them from leaving, which is why it is vital for victims to find support in order to leave and protect themselves and their child from future harm. Fortunately today there are many institutions and organizations that help abused spouses and their children and assist in providing temporary shelter, counseling, and financial help.